Search Results for "child self-esteem"

Childhood Lessons: How Much Do They Impact Adult Life?

...er people, and what to expect of life in general. Children quickly learn what to do to avoid criticism and how to elicit praise and attention in their experiences with family, at school, and with other significant adults and children in their lives. A child with a violent parent for example, may learn that keeping quiet, agreeing, and avoiding confrontation is important. A child who is given positive attention only when they ...

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Support For New Mums

...friends who will give you unwanted advice, or be unknowingly dismissive Scarlett Gill is a compassionate and empathic clinical psychologist who specialises in working with kids, teens, adults, parents, and families. She is dedicated to helping people overcome whatever problems they are experiencing in their lives, whether it be anxiety, stress, depression, low-self-esteem, self-harm, and behavioural problems....

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10 Tips For Raising Strong Daughters

...ughter to Pursue a Passion Confident teens are strong teens Encourage her to try a wide range of activities, and when she finds one she loves, support her to engage in the activity. Pursuing a passion not only helps to boost self-esteem, it also affirms your daughters values. Tip #2: Make Joint Decisions In all decisions that affect her, whenever possible, give her a voice in the decision-making process. By involving her in the process of...

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6 Tips For Coping With Infertility

...u’ve had previous miscarriages your period can also be a reminder of previous losses. You will feel upset when your period arrives, but try not to get caught up in the thoughts that come with this. It’s easier said than done, but buying into these thoughts will affect your mood and your anxiety. Dr. Sarah Hughes is a clinical psychologist and the founder of Think Clinical Psychologists. She enjoys working with children, adolescents, and adults,...

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Parenting Teen Girls: When Did Sexy Become The New Pretty?

...I’ve had far too many teens tell me just how much it means to them to have others admire them for their body. I’m still struggling to get my head around this. How did we get here? When did it become the norm to measure your self-worth by how many likes your ‘sexy-selfie’ gets on Facebook? And since when has beauty been about box gaps??? Haven’t heard of it yet? A box gap is the space between your thighs – no I’m not m ...

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Are Unmet Needs Blocking You From Achieving Your Goals?

...physical pain), emotional (e.g. a need for understanding and support from others, or a need for a sense of emotional safety and self-understanding), or social (e.g. a need for a sense of belonging, or a need for autonomy and self-identity). Is time for self-care one of your unmet needs? In most situations, we know what we need and we can work towards having our needs met. But what about when we don’t know what we need? Not knowing what ...

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Screen Time With Kids: How Much Is Too Much?

...evelopment and attachment may be missed. What Does The Research Say? For starters, the content of what kids watch is important. Overall there is limited research that has studied the long term effects of screen time in young children. Some research has shown that fast paced children’s shows (such as action cartoons) with rapid changing screens are correlated with later attentional problems in children. This makes sense, if we can unders ...

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How To Cope Returning To Work Post Baby

...it comes to household chores, shopping and meal-planning. You can try ordering groceries online, out-sourcing chores like ironing, and preparing meals to be frozen for later. Remember, it’s impossible to do it all yourself, so letting yourself ‘off the hook’ is key. Brittany McGill is a clinical psychologist who completed her postgraduate clinical training at the University of New South Wales. She is interested in anxiety and mood...

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5 Tips To Help You Get Along With Your Teen…Yes It’s Possible

...t acknowledging your own mistakes will help them to do this. Parents often fear that they’ll lose the respect of their teen if they admit they’re not perfect, but double standards are like a red flag to a bull with teens and your teen is much more likely to respect you if you’re open and honest. Dr. Sarah Hughes is a clinical psychologist and the founder of Think Clinical Psychologists. She enjoys working with children, adolescents, and adults,...

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Have You Set The Right New Years Resolutions?

...ologist with more than 15 years of experience working with children, adolescents, young adults and families. She has a special interest in working with adolescents experiencing depression, anxiety, self-harm, school refusal, self-esteem issues, family breakdown, behavioural difficulties, HSC and school-stress. Her areas of expertise with children include developmental and behavioural difficulties, emotion reg ...

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