Search Results for "child self-esteem"

Parenting Teens: Turning Conflict Into Compromise

...flict, and may also help improve your relationship with him or her too. Scarlett Gill is a compassionate and empathic clinical psychologist who specialises in working with kids, teens, adults, parents, and families. She is dedicated to helping people overcome whatever problems they are experiencing in their lives, whether it be anxiety, stress, depression, low-self-esteem, self-harm, and behavioural problems....

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Perfectionism: 4 Tips To Help You Let Go Of Your Need To Be Perfect

...as failures when others wouldn’t • Feel that there’s always something that needs to be better The drive to be perfect is a hidden cause of most common presentations – anxiety, stress, depression, eating disorders, low self-esteem, postnatal depression, just to name a few. If your quest for perfection is affecting your happiness – set a new goal. Try to be perfect at being imperfect. Here’s how. Tip #1: Look at the Pros and C ...

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Judgements + Emotions: Why They Don’t Mix

...pportunity for secondary unpleasant emotions to arise. It may not remove your initial emotional response, but it won’t make it worse either. So next time you notice yourself feeling bad, check in with yourself. Are you being self-accepting and self-compassionate or are you criticising yourself for feeling this way? Just for experiment’s sake, try the non-judgmental approach and see how you feel. W ...

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Is It Safe To Give Kids Anti-Depressants?

...s and so the downward spiral continues. Sometimes you need a circuit breaker and sometimes that circuit breaker is medication. It won’t be a “quick fix” and it should always be only an adjunct treatment, not the primary treatment, but be open to considering it as an option if it’s advised. Dr. Sarah Hughes is a clinical psychologist and the founder of Think Clinical Psychologists. She enjoys working with children, adolescents, and adults,...

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Parenting: Are You A Helicopter Parent?

...o want to protect your child from all the potential harms and threats the world has to offer. But does hovering help or hinder? The first study to define helicopter parenting and its long-term effects found that hovered-over children grow up to be dependent, neurotic and less open than children who are allowed more freedom. This effect has also been seen in older children – a study at the Keene State College in New Hamp ...

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5 Tips To Help You Ask For What You Want

...ou have to say does not matter, it is not important, it is not valuable. What other people want or have to say is more important. Breaking free from your need to please can help to restore your sense of self and improve your self-esteem. Learn to value your own options and ideas and others will follow your lead. Here are a few tips to get you started. Tip #1: Watch Your Level Of Agreeableness It can be easy to follow the suggestions and wants ...

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Tips To Break Away From Emotional Eating

...tional and physical health as well. Kim is a warm and empathetic clinical psychology registrar who is passionate about working with adults and young adults to improve their quality of life, enhance adaptive coping/functioning, and reduce suffering. Kim works with a range of presentations including drug and alcohol problems, addiction, issues relating to managing intense emotions, eating disorders and eating related difficulties, low self-esteem...

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4 Tips For Raising Kind Kids

...o Zoom In + Out To be kind to others kids need to learn to zoom in to listen closely to other people and understand their concerns, and zoom out and have the ability to see things from other people’s point of view. Help your child to practice these skills by modelling. Tip #3: Be A Role Model Lead by example. Be honest about your mistakes and teach your children that they don’t have to be perfect. Take stock of what you’re teaching your...

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Childhood Lessons: How Much Do They Impact Adult Life?

...er people, and what to expect of life in general. Children quickly learn what to do to avoid criticism and how to elicit praise and attention in their experiences with family, at school, and with other significant adults and children in their lives. A child with a violent parent for example, may learn that keeping quiet, agreeing, and avoiding confrontation is important. A child who is given positive attention only when they ...

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Parenting Teens: How Can I Help My Teen Make Good Decisions?

...ituation: Will it matter in the longer term if my teen makes a decision I don’t agree with? Is it more important for my teen to do what I want them to do or for them to practice making decisions? If my teen gets it wrong what might they learn that will help them make a better decision next time? Dr. Sarah Hughes is a clinical psychologist and the founder of Think Clinical Psychologists. She enjoys working with children, adolescents, and adults,...

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